The Nameless One

The Creator God: The Creator God:
The Followers of the The Followers of the
Nameless One Nameless One
The Nameless One (the Creator) The Nameless One (the Creator)
Myths
The 101 Steps to Enlightenment
Long ago, longer than most remember, the wise and ancient Limmik
Kunar came to a realization – that it is mortality that leads to all things
unworthy. His reasoning was simple enough: Because we die, we become
attached to life. Because we are attached to life, we are attached to the
trappings of life. Because we are attached to the trappings of life, we
will commit evil to have them. Because we will commit evil to have the
trappings of life, we can be manipulated by those who claim they can help
us achieve more in life or receive a greater reward in death.
Master Kunar understood that the primary manipulators of those attached
to the trappings of life were members of the religious castes. From the
wayfarers of Darmon to the matriarchs of Morwyn, every church offered
mortals understanding of how to please the gods and be rewarded in the
afterlife. Yet even the afterlife was an illusion, a series of trappings that
continued the cycle of life, in which the mortal races could be manipulated
into acting against their nature. The gods of the tree and their priests
promised one of three paths beyond death: a life of eternal happiness,
torment perpetual, or rebirth into the world to continue the cycle. All
three paths seemed to Master Kunar to be continuations of the unworthy
aspects of mortality, for is not eternal life under the thumb of the gods
simply a life of service to their beliefs and manipulations? And is not a life
of torment perpetual a terrible evil that none would desire to suffer? And
is not rebirth to try again simply rebirth into the same manipulations?
And so Limmik turned his study to the Creator, the Nameless One who
made all things and then departed from them. Surely, the only way to be
free of the veil of tears that is eternal rebirth and death, punishment or
subjugation at the hands of the gods of the tree, is to leave the sphere. Only
by being free of existence entirely can one be assured of freedom from the
unworthiness of mortality.
With this in mind, Master Kunar spent his life discovering the 101 steps
to Enlightenment, the mantras and contemplations necessary for his own
enlightenment. And at the end of his life, it is said that Limmik Kunar
became one with the power of the Nameless One or departed the sphere or
became a being of pure energy from beyond the Great Sphere; while there
are confl icting reports and understandings of the old master’s final fate, all
agree that he did not die, but simply disappeared one day.
Sadly for those that walked after him, Master Kunar’s 101 steps, which
he painstakingly documented for his disciples, did not result in a similar
freedom from the Great Sphere for his followers. The earliest steps were
quite useful to harnessing the power he called “ki,” but later in the process
the steps, though clearly useful for Limmik to become detached from those
things that were important to him in his life, had no meaning for his
disciples. And so all who wish to depart the sphere, break the cycle, and
be free of existence must walk a new path of discipline and set down their
own steps.
Associations
The Nameless One is the creator god, the dispassionate one, the
beginning and the end of all things, the order to and breaking of
the universe. He is not associated with any animal or other part
of the mortal sphere, since He is beyond the Great Sphere. He is
“worshipped” by monks and some rare, disciplined members of other
classes, such as wizards, who believe that understanding Him is the key
to understanding all of creation. His followers are rare among all the
races, but are mainly found among humans.
Alignment
The Nameless One is neutral.
Representations
The Nameless One is never represented in icons, due to an ancient
superstition that even to reproduce His likeness would end the
world. In great works showing the history of creation, the Nameless
One is shown as a being of light, shaped like a humanoid, but with
no features.
Symbolically, the Nameless One is represented either with a point,
or dot, which has no beginning or end (usually a black dot, which
followers place or tattoo on the palms of both of their hands). In
three dimensions, the Nameless One can be symbolically represented
by a strip with a half-twist in it, curled into a ring. It therefore has
no beginning, end, inside, or outside.
Purpose
The Nameless One’s motivations are entirely mysterious. It is
assumed He watches existence still, but many believe He cares no
more for the universe than a giant cares for the smallest mite. He
provides no divine powers to followers, never answers prayer, and
could be entirely imaginary for all the impact He has on the universe
as it exists today.
Servants:
The Nameless One is said to have no servants in the universe, but those
who have sought to travel outside the great sphere using magic have
encountered powerful guardians blocking the way. Some believe that
the Nameless One has made many universes and places barriers between
them to keep them from commingling, as a wizard might keep her
various experiments in separate phials and beakers to keep them from
interacting.
The Church The Church
Church Description
There is no church of the Nameless One. Rather, the monasteries
that dot the landscape are, many of them, places of study for those
who walk the path of master Kunar. They seek to become one with
the Nameless One or to leave the great sphere as He did. Therefore,
playing a monk player character can be the equivalent of playing a
“worshiper” of the Nameless One – at least that is how the worshipers
of the gods of the tree might understand it.
While there are now orders of monks who have learned to harness ki
and yet do not seek to leave the great sphere, but rather seek physical
perfection, their roots are all in the work of the old master, Limmik
Kunar. Players wishing to play monks should decide with their GM
what the outlook of their monastery is.
There are no holy orders to the monasteries but monks, and while
some monasteries or cultures may have prestige classes appropriate
to the disciples of Master Kunar, there are none that are universal (so
none are set out in this book).
The “ Vola Ulfhedin” referred to in Appendix I is also best
understood as a worshiper of the Nameless One. There are barbarian
societies that know the full tale of the pantheon and actually refuse
to worship the gods. They see them all as children of the real god,
the Nameless One, and believe we are in a world abandoned by any
authority that actually matters. They seek to lead good lives despite
this abandonment, and tell the tales of the gods as lessons to lead
one’s life by. They bear no holy symbols and offer no prayers to any
god, even the Nameless One.

The Nameless One

World of Tersa ThomasJones